Greenville County Animal Care is ending its agreement with Spartanburg County

A change is coming to Greenville County Animal Care. Animal Care has announced that it will no longer be able to accept stray animals from Spartanburg County, starting June 30. .A county official says it was a temporary deal. Cox said. As Spartanburg County and Greenville County grow, Greenville County Animal Care says it can’t continue to do so. “These shelters are completely outdated,” Cox said. “We are full. Everyone is full.” The Spartanburg Humane Society says it could feel the impacts and is turning to Spartanburg County for help. response,” Cox said. Cox says they already have a waiting list of over 56 dogs. She says they euthanize less than 1% of dogs, but they need the county’s help to keep that from increasing. “We have to understand that it might cost us a bit more in our wallets to pay that extra amount in your taxes that it will take to properly care for the animals in our community,” she said. pay for good animal care, and it’s going to be expensive to do it right, and we’re really going to have to shell out money for it,” she said. are always directing people to call Spartanburg County Animal Control Animal Care They have been of tremendous support to us over the years helping us with the care and welfare of the animals in our county While we are grateful to Greenville County and their assistance, both teams knew from the start that Spartanburg County would, at some point, transition to caring for our animals in the county. months, we have started preliminary discussions with our pa community stakeholders on this transition, as well as best shelter operations and practices, as we strive to ensure permanent, safe and appropriate housing for our animals. Over the next few weeks, we will be discussing a transition schedule with Greenville County that will ensure continuity of care for our animal community. Spartanburg County will provide updates along the way.”

A change is coming to Greenville County Animal Care.

Animal Care announced that it will no longer be able to accept stray animals from Spartanburg County starting June 30.

About 10 years ago, Greenville County Animal Care said it began taking in Spartanburg County strays.

A county official said it was a temporary deal.

“Our benchmark has always been, since 2011, to call animal control. They’ll pick him up and they’ll bring him to Greenville County Animal Care,” said Angel Cox, CEO of the Spartanburg Humane Society.

As Spartanburg County and Greenville County grow, Greenville County Animal Care says it can’t continue to do so.

“These shelters are completely overrun,” Cox said. “We are full. Everyone is full.

The Spartanburg Humane Society says it could feel the impacts and is turning to Spartanburg County for help.

“Our phones are already ringing with people asking us questions about what to do, so we definitely need an answer,” Cox said.

Cox says they already have a waiting list of over 56 dogs. She says they euthanize less than 1% of dogs, but they need the county’s help to keep that from increasing.

“We have to understand that it might cost us a little more in our pocketbooks to pay that extra amount in your taxes that it will take to properly care for the animals in our community,” she said.

Cox says they need Spartanburg County to invest in its own animal care facility to help accommodate the growing number of strays.

“We have to be willing to pay for good animal care, and it’s going to be expensive to do it right, and we’re really going to have to shell out money for it,” she said.

Right now, Cox says they’re still asking people to call Spartanburg County Animal Control.

In response to the termination of the agreement with Greenville County Animal Care, Spartanburg County shared the following statement:

“We appreciate the great relationship we have had with our friends at Greenville County and Greenville County Animal Care. They have been tremendously supportive over the years in helping us with the care and well-being of While we are grateful for Greenville County and their assistance, both teams knew from the start that Spartanburg County would, at some point, transition to caring for our animals in the county. Over the past few months, we have begun preliminary discussions with our community partners about this transition, as well as best shelter operations and practices, as we work to ensure permanent, safe and appropriate housing for our animals. Over the next few weeks, we will be discussing a transition schedule with Greenville County that will ensure continuity of care for our animal community.

Spartanburg County will provide updates along the way.”

Benjamin M. Yerger